Want to Play at a Different College? O.K., but Not There or There

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Sue Ogrocki/Associated Press

Sue Ogrocki/Associated Press

Excerpts:

The forces at work were not new, but Gundy, like a growing number of coaches, chose to harness them to eliminate many, if not all, of Lunt’s preferred options and to keep a potential rival from gaining the services of a highly regarded quarterback entering his sophomore season. It was a powerful illustration of the big-business mind-set of college sports and the control that coaches have over players.

Universities have long sought to block student-athletes from transferring to a rival program. Alabama’s football team, for example, would not be expected to let a star player go to Auburn. But the impulse to limit the student-athlete’s options has been heightened to the point that coaches are now blacklisting dozens of universities.

Proponents of transfer limits say that they are put in place to prevent coaches from continually attempting to lure athletes from other universities, which could create a never-ending recruiting cycle. Critics counter that the rules make it much too easy for coaches to act punitively, penalizing athletes for changing their minds about decisions made when they were teenagers.

The N.C.A.A. also declined to comment.
The N.C.A.A. also declined to comment.
The N.C.A.A. also declined to comment.

Oops, I got a little repetitive there.

So, here is a plan. Coach Highest Paid Public Official in the State (we’ll call him “Your Holiness”) recruits two players. We’ll call them Pheeeenom 1 and Pheeeenom 2.

P1 and P2 play the same position. His Holiness wants a year to see who is best. Then he wants to keep the other from playing for any team that might be in the same rankings as his team. And opponents. And teams on TV that might diminish his ratings. So what if that is the end of the career of the lesser Pheeeenom.

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